Hudson Area Library Local History Talk on Women’s Role in the Leisler Rebellion

LocalHistoryJan2019
The Hudson Area Library presents Local History Talk on Women’s Role in the Leisler Rebellion.

The Hudson Area Library History Room, in collaboration with the  Leisler Institute for the Study of Early New York History & the Gotham Center for New York City History present the latest in its Local History Speaker series: ‘How Their Poor Wives Do’: The Role of Women in Late Seventeenth-century New York Politics by David Voorhees,

Widespread female violence against men is found in the records of the 1689 New York
uprising popularly known as “Leisler’s Rebellion.” Indeed, women played a prominent role in the uprising. This talk by the director of the Leisler Institute explores this outburst of activism among New York women a generation after the English takeover of New Netherland.

Dr. Voorhees is director of the Jacob Leisler Papers Project, formerly located at New York
University, as well as the Jacob Leisler Institute headquartered in Hudson. He’s also managing editor of de Halve Maen (The Half Moon), a quarterly scholarly journal published by The Holland Society of New York. An NYU research scientist, he is former managing reference history editor at Charles Scribner’s Sons and has published numerous historical works and articles, and been a consultant on historical exhibits at the Museum of the City of New York and the Bard Graduate Center in Manhattan among others.

A question and answer period and refreshments will follow the talk.

The Jacob Leisler Institute for the Study of Early New York History is an independent, not-for-profit study and research center devoted to collecting, preserving, and disseminating information relating to colonial New York under English rule. In the years spanning 1664 to 1773, New York province’s diverse European settlements and Native American and African populations fused into a cosmopolitan colonial territory with ties throughout the Atlantic World. The Institute is unique in focusing on this under examined 109-year period in American history. The Institute contains a collection of original, digital, and/or paper copies of primary source manuscripts, books, maps, and illustrative materials, as well as a library of secondary resources that provide scholarly context to the primary sources. The Jacob Leisler Institute is an open resource for both scholars and the interested public.

The Hudson Area Library History Room houses a special collection that pertains to the history of the City of Hudson, Greenport and Stockport; as well as Columbia County and New York State. The History Room also hosts the Local History Speaker Series at the library, offering free monthly talks on diverse topics related to the history of Hudson, Greenport, Stockport, and Columbia County.

The History Room hours are Tuesdays 4 – 6pm and Saturdays 10am – 12pm, during which
people visit and browse the extensive collection of city directories, yearbooks and local history books; and research items in the archival collection. The public can also request information on local history that volunteers will research. Appointments are available upon request. For more information email reference@hudsonarealibrary.org, call 518.828.1792 x100, or visit the main desk in the library.

DATE/TIME:
Thursday, January 10, 2019: 6pm to 7:30pm

LOCATION:
Hudson Area Library
Community Room, (wheelchair accessible)
51 N. 5th St. (at State St.)
Hudson, NY 12534

ADMISSION:
Free and open to the public.

MORE:
HudsonAreaLibrary.org
email: programs@hudsonarealibrary.org
Tel: 518-828-1792 x101, or visit the main desk in the library

 

For more local happenings, news, and events, follow ColumbiaCountyCurrent on Facebook, and twitter @CoCoCurrent.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.